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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 21
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: w
into syria to secure these chemical weapons sites, but as of just today there have been no signs that any of those forces have been put on alert or there was any detail planning to do this. so there was some question here of whether assad may be calling t president's bluff. >> rose: and what exactly do you think they would be prepared to do and what would trigger that? clearly the movement of them. but it is more or less than that? >> well, u.s. intelligence officials were watching very closely the movement of syrian forces and in also trying to divine the intentions of president assad. clearly the rebels in syria have had a very good few -- past few weeks and making advances on the capital of damascus and president assad really feels like his back may be up against the wall. but is he desperate enough now to play this card which would almost certainly draw some kind of western response. >> rose: one more time, the red line is simply moving the chemical weapons? >> well, this is interesting, charlie, because the president said either moving them or using them. today secretary of state cli
and saying no to bad things, but we need to do more than that gwen: abroad, tensions in syria on the rise. can the u.s. intervene? should we? covering the week -- jackie calmes of "new york times," eamon javers of cnbc, amy walter of abc news, and james kitfield of "national journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corpo
making the wrong assumptions about syria's secular state. syrian state tv was in the room to film. none of the men had been in court. all have confessed to being in al qaeda-style groups. >> the main work is making explosive devices to plant. >> they produce the algerian passport of this person, who said he was also a french citizen. >> i decided to do something for the children of syria, for the families and the powerless. i decided to join the jihad rather than crying in front of my tv. >> he would not answer when i asked if he had been tortured. two said there were part of a front which the americans might name as a terrorist group. i cannot vouch for what they said. one repeated how well they had been looked after. but a trip to district 86 in damascus explains why the regime rests them. how whites -- allowites linda into a flat's wracked by a car bomb. his sister was one of 15 killed. she blames jihad this -- jihadists. diplomats say they do operate in syria as a small part of the armed rebellion. it is turning lives upside-down and ending them. it is impossible to say what is goin
. obviously, when he comes in, iran will be a key issue. syria will be a key issue. unwinding the war from a diplomatic stand on in afghanistan. there will be this very significant agenda as he becomes the chief diplomat in the united states. >> in tackling this questions, those big issues like iran, like syria where a lot of people are calling for much tougher action, how do you think he will respond to those problems? what will be his priority? >> you were saying earlier, the contrast between john kerry and susan rice. he knows barack obama well. they served together on the senate foreign relations committee. but he does not bring the relationship into the job that susan rice would have. part of it would be sitting down with the president and determining what is, aside from world events that are already on the to do list -- where does barack obama want to make his mark in the second term? middle east peace? global warming? immigration reform? obviously, that will determine to some extent where john kerry moves going forward. >> thank you very much for joining us. as we just heard, what t
and representative enough of the syrian population, >> ifill: hours later, the friends of syria meeting in marrakech, morocco took the same step. the u.s. became one of 114 nations to endorse the syrian national council created just last month under international pressure. deputy secretary of state william burns: >> in a growing number of towns and villages, a new syria is being born, the regime of bashar al assad must and will go, the sooner he steps aside the better for all syrians. >> ifill: despite showing signs last week of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action against the assad regime. foreign minister sergei lavrov: >> ( translated ): as the coalition has been recognized as the only legitimate representative, it seems that the united states decided to place all bets on the armed victory of this very national coalition. >> ifill: but no weapons have been promised, and a spokesman for the coalition said it needs real support. the u.s. has resisted sending arms, amid fears they might wind up in the hands of islamic extre
heats up, syria. >> i think the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. gwen: on the domestic front, the slow march towards the fiscal cliff continues. >> i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage. >> it's clear the president is just not serious about cutting spending. >> covering the week, reid wilson of "the hotline," david sanger of "the new york times," martha raddatz of abc news, and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factory. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've
that and tell americans what we are for. >> in syria, a concern about the possible use of weapons of mass destruction if south. >> the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> the chattering classes are already chatting about 2016. >> look, i am flattered, i am honored. that is not in the future for may. "tim brant's college football captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> for the record, the unemployment rate has dropped to 7.7%, the economy adding 146,000 jobs in november. we want to keep that in mind as we head towards the fiscal cliff. only four in 10 americans expect the white house and congress to reach a deal on the cliff before the first of the year, and if this goes south, a 53% of the american people are prepared to blame republicans. the president's job approval rating is well over 50%. congress' approval rating is under 20%. why what a the president back down? >> the president isn't interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding a fiscal cliff, and clearly not been tested at all in cutting and spe
. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to
minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. envoy for syria, lakhdar brahimi. >> we reviewed the very mr. brahimi had his own additional information to contribute about what he is hearing from sources inside syria and both minister lavrov and i committed to support a renewed push by brahimi and his team to work with all the stakeholders in syria to begin a political transition. meanwhile, rebels in syria made the damascus international airport an official battleground. they said it's a legitimate target and they urged civilians to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the firs
and the regime in syria. in his annual news conference, putin insisted his country is not protecting syrian president bashar assad. he urged assad to hold talks with the opposition, and negotiate an end to the bloodshed. >> ( translated ): we are not concerned about the fate of assad's regime. we understand what is going on there and that his family has been in power for 40 years. the changes are undoubtedly needed. we are worried about a different thing-- what next? we simply don't want the current opposition, having become the authorities, to start fighting the people who are the current authorities and become the opposition and we don't want this to go on forever. >> sreenivasan: on another matter, putin indicated he plans to sign a law banning u.s. adoptions of russian children. that move is retaliation for a new u.s. law aimed at punishing russian human rights violators. in u.s. economic news, growth during the summer quarter was better than first estimated. the commerce department reported today the economy grew at an annual rate of 3.1%. and on wall street today, the dow jones indust
to sing us a patriotic song, but she was soon overwhelmed by the general chant, "god, syria, bashar al-assad." asked tow draw a picture, this little artist came up with tanks and guns in the colors of the government flag. this is one of several shelters across damascus for people displaced by the fighting. >> ( translated ): the reason we're doing this is because we've seen what happens to syrians who have to leave the country for refugee camps. they're treated very badly. we don't want that to happen again. >> reporter: they may wear anoraks, but they claim anywhere here is welcome, whatever their political affiliation. perhaps, predictably, we couldn't find anyone here who said they support 9 rebels. one said, "any opportunity to go home would be lethal." >> ( translated ): they threaten me. if i go back, because i did not go to partly to mostly there, because i support the president. >> reporter: in a place where assad's senior and junior stare down, as families eat, one man still wouldn't speak openly, even in denouncing the rebels in a place like that. >> ( translated ): sometimes
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)